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Tuesday, 02 July 2019

A TALE OF 2 ESTATE AGENTS! PART 1

A VIEWING TRIP WITH PAUL BARNETT

It’s quite a big move – to leave behind all you are familiar with and to go on an adventure – to put your trust in someone else’s hands to help you make your dream come true.  Not to mention the fact that you are going to be parting with cash, hard earned – and in to a property purchasing system that you may well not be familiar with….

Where to start when there are a myriad of estate agents on offer?


Personal recommendation was my starting point. Hence, I found myself going inside the offices of Inland Andalucía in Mollina.  Some cool water and a very warm, friendly, helpful Lady (Pam) got “the relationship” off to a great start.  Following an initial chat, a viewing day with Paul Barnett was arranged. 


I would defy anyone not to immediately feel comfortable in Paul’s company, since he takes great pains to make you feel at ease.  This is not just about looking at bricks and mortar, or bedrooms and that all-important outside space.  This is about building the, “Know, Like and Trust” factor, building rapport, sharing information so that he/she can truly help and support you in this exciting process.


Of course, visiting the properties is simply the tip of the iceberg.  On that day, we covered a lot of miles and 5 different properties.  Paul’s professionalism, energy and enthusiasm never waned as he morphed in to a “tour guide” and “life style” coach. And I use those terms with utmost respect.  Any good agent will help you to gain sufficient knowledge on an area, environment, costs, repairs, re-modelling to create your ideal home, or not – when you might be trying too hard to like something that just isn’t right for you.  (Thanks for that one, Paul!)


I cannot stress just how much a good estate agent brings to this particular party.  Their ultimate goal is not just to sell you a property but also to see you settled and as Paul said to me, after 3 days of viewings and a further fact-finding session across the desk – “Our job really begins once you are in the property.  We don’t just abandon you with the keys!” 


My takeaway from the whole Inland Andalucía experience?  


A sense of excitement and calm.  A sense of security in the very sure knowledge that I truly feel that I am in Safe Hands with the whole team at Inland Andalucía

It’s quite a big move – to leave behind all you are familiar with and to go on an adventure – to put your trust in someone else’s hands to help you make your dream come true.  Not to mention the fact that you are going to be parting with cash, hard earned – and in to a property purchasing system that you may well not be familiar with….

Where to start when there are a myriad of estate agents on offer?


Personal recommendation was my starting point. Hence, I found myself going inside the offices of Inland Andalucía in Mollina.  Some cool water and a very warm, friendly, helpful Lady (Pam) got “the relationship” off to a great start.  Following an initial chat, a viewing day with Paul Barnett was arranged. 


I would defy anyone not to immediately feel comfortable in Paul’s company, since he takes great pains to make you feel at ease.  This is not just about looking at bricks and mortar, or bedrooms and that all-important outside space.  This is about building the, “Know, Like and Trust” factor, building rapport, sharing information so that he/she can truly help and support you in this exciting process.


Of course, visiting the properties is simply the tip of the iceberg.  On that day, we covered a lot of miles and 5 different properties.  Paul’s professionalism, energy and enthusiasm never waned as he morphed in to a “tour guide” and “life style” coach. And I use those terms with utmost respect.  Any good agent will help you to gain sufficient knowledge on an area, environment, costs, repairs, re-modelling to create your ideal home, or not – when you might be trying too hard to like something that just isn’t right for you.  (Thanks for that one, Paul!)


I cannot stress just how much a good estate agent brings to this particular party.  Their ultimate goal is not just to sell you a property but also to see you settled and as Paul said to me, after 3 days of viewings and a further fact-finding session across the desk – “Our job really begins once you are in the property.  We don’t just abandon you with the keys!” 


My takeaway from the whole Inland Andalucía experience?  


A sense of excitement and calm.  A sense of security in the very sure knowledge that I truly feel that I am in Safe Hands with the whole team at Inland Andalucía

Posted by: Graham at 13:03

Labels:

Tuesday, 02 July 2019

A TALE OF 2 ESTATE AGENTS! PART 2

Hopefully, you have had a chance to read about my experiences last week.  The sort of experience you need when you are ready to buy your home in Spain!  But if not, you can view it here…………

So, back on the road for another viewing trip with a different estate agent – who, I fear, must remain nameless just now!

Exciting times and really looking forward to viewing one property in particularly!  If the pictures were anything to go by…we would surely get the Spanish house of our dreams!

On the morning in question, in my usual way, I confirmed the meeting ahead of our journey since we needed to travel for at good 90 minutes!  Off we went.  Brunch in the sunshine, high expectations, loving the town we had arrived at.  And then, it went rapidly downhill on meeting the agent!

Where to start?  Best if I simply sum it up for you!  Here goes:

  • It was clear there was something amiss as soon as we met!  Seemingly, the agent had been up since 3am with heartburn and immediately asked could we reschedule?  It’s not that I am not sympathetic but perhaps the best time might have been in response to my confirmation e-mail rather than a journey that took us 90 minutes!  Nicely, I asked if we could at least view one property!!
  • As we were approaching the property, our agent was “hopeful” that the key was still in the same place!  And equally as “hopeful” that the code for the key box hadn’t changed!  Now, correct me if I am wrong but should that not be checked out before?  In order that poor, “hopeful” viewers who have not just travelled locally, but from the UK, can get into the property?
  • Once inside…what a total let down!  The property and bore no resemblance whatsoever to the online pictures.  Not just a little bit, a whole lot!  Ditto: All but one of the properties we visited.  So much so, that my husband simply refused to continue with one viewing when we could have done with a machete to clear the undergrowth on to a patio area!
  • And on to another property…. and I’m not entirely sure I would want an estate agent stretched out on my sofa, declaring they could stay there all day! Am I being picky?  
  • Perhaps I am also being picky when I tell you that I am not a great one for being driven at speed (eat your heart out Lewis Hamilton), and bouncing over speed humps (which this particular agent “hated”).  Fond memories of how Paul made me, and hubby, when he was present, feel so at ease and comfortable???  

Do you get the feeling that this trip is deteriorating badly?  Read on for a little longer…..

I think for me, the final straw was how a call to a client was handled.  Due to one of the properties not being within walking distance to facilities, the agent called the vendor and cancelled the viewing.  Now, I admit, that I have spent all of my working life (nearly 40 years) in “customer care”.  The one thing that is guaranteed to send me over the “edge/top” is when it doesn’t happen! 

The conversation was short, a little sharp and when the agent came off the phone, proceeded to moan about the vendor moaning, and how it was no one’s fault that we had cancelled.  And it was certainly not “their,” (the agent’s) problem, that the vendor had spent time cleaning the property.  “It was always spotless anyway!”

BIG MISTAKE!!!  WE ARE POTENTIAL CLIENTS OF THE FUTURE!

And so, I am sure you will agree that this particular viewing experience was something of a nightmare.  Would I buy a property through this person?  No!  Would I sell a property through this person?  No!  At the end of the day, people buy from people, don’t they?  I know I do!

Never was I more grateful to get back to the car and head for home!  And the happy ever after here is that we are in the process of purchasing a beautiful town house through Inland Andalucía.

Thank you Team Inland Andalucía! We don’t just “think” we are in Safe Hands, we know we are!

Hopefully, you have had a chance to read about my experiences last week.  The sort of experience you need when you are ready to buy your home in Spain!  But if not, you can view it here…………

So, back on the road for another viewing trip with a different estate agent – who, I fear, must remain nameless just now!

Exciting times and really looking forward to viewing one property in particularly!  If the pictures were anything to go by…we would surely get the Spanish house of our dreams!

On the morning in question, in my usual way, I confirmed the meeting ahead of our journey since we needed to travel for at good 90 minutes!  Off we went.  Brunch in the sunshine, high expectations, loving the town we had arrived at.  And then, it went rapidly downhill on meeting the agent!

Where to start?  Best if I simply sum it up for you!  Here goes:

  • It was clear there was something amiss as soon as we met!  Seemingly, the agent had been up since 3am with heartburn and immediately asked could we reschedule?  It’s not that I am not sympathetic but perhaps the best time might have been in response to my confirmation e-mail rather than a journey that took us 90 minutes!  Nicely, I asked if we could at least view one property!!
  • As we were approaching the property, our agent was “hopeful” that the key was still in the same place!  And equally as “hopeful” that the code for the key box hadn’t changed!  Now, correct me if I am wrong but should that not be checked out before?  In order that poor, “hopeful” viewers who have not just travelled locally, but from the UK, can get into the property?
  • Once inside…what a total let down!  The property and bore no resemblance whatsoever to the online pictures.  Not just a little bit, a whole lot!  Ditto: All but one of the properties we visited.  So much so, that my husband simply refused to continue with one viewing when we could have done with a machete to clear the undergrowth on to a patio area!
  • And on to another property…. and I’m not entirely sure I would want an estate agent stretched out on my sofa, declaring they could stay there all day! Am I being picky?  
  • Perhaps I am also being picky when I tell you that I am not a great one for being driven at speed (eat your heart out Lewis Hamilton), and bouncing over speed humps (which this particular agent “hated”).  Fond memories of how Paul made me, and hubby, when he was present, feel so at ease and comfortable???  

Do you get the feeling that this trip is deteriorating badly?  Read on for a little longer…..

I think for me, the final straw was how a call to a client was handled.  Due to one of the properties not being within walking distance to facilities, the agent called the vendor and cancelled the viewing.  Now, I admit, that I have spent all of my working life (nearly 40 years) in “customer care”.  The one thing that is guaranteed to send me over the “edge/top” is when it doesn’t happen! 

The conversation was short, a little sharp and when the agent came off the phone, proceeded to moan about the vendor moaning, and how it was no one’s fault that we had cancelled.  And it was certainly not “their,” (the agent’s) problem, that the vendor had spent time cleaning the property.  “It was always spotless anyway!”

BIG MISTAKE!!!  WE ARE POTENTIAL CLIENTS OF THE FUTURE!

And so, I am sure you will agree that this particular viewing experience was something of a nightmare.  Would I buy a property through this person?  No!  Would I sell a property through this person?  No!  At the end of the day, people buy from people, don’t they?  I know I do!

Never was I more grateful to get back to the car and head for home!  And the happy ever after here is that we are in the process of purchasing a beautiful town house through Inland Andalucía.

Thank you Team Inland Andalucía! We don’t just “think” we are in Safe Hands, we know we are!

Posted by: Graham at 13:03

Labels:

Tuesday, 27 March 2018

The Osborne Bull

 

If you take a road trip around the 505,990 square kilometres of Spain, it is common to see the image of a huge black bull standing at the top of a hill or near a road in different places. This feature is known nationally as "The Osborne Bull."

For 60 years, the Osborne Bull has been keeping watch over some of our roads. In the beginning, this figure was a billboard which only measured about 4 metres high, and which nowadays -those that remain - reach 14 metres weighing up to 4,000 kilos.

Over the decades, the Osborne Bull has become integrated into the roadside landscape, and despite the controversies that have arisen around it, the Spanish have adapted it as a decorative part of other items, like car stickers, on t-shirts, caps, key rings, at sporting events (appearing at least in the stands) and including being superimposed on the Spanish flag as a shield.

How was this symbol born?

It all started when the Osborne company, one of the oldest brandy exporting bodegas in the world and the second largest in Spain, decided to create a logo that would represent one of its most recognised brands of spirits, called "Veterano".

This is how the Osborne Bull, also called the the "Spanish Bull", was created by the hand of the painter and artist, Manuel Prieto, who was the Artistic Director of the Azor advertising agency, which was hired to launch this advertising campaign.

The first of these unique bulls was put into place in 1957 in the town of Cabanillas de la Sierra, right at kilometre 55 on the motorway from Madrid to Burgos. Three years later (1960), there were already 500 throughout the peninsula, originally made of wood, until its structure was changed to metal to resist bad weather.

Currently, only 91 bulls remain, distributed irregularly throughout Spain. Most are around Marco de Jerez, especially in the Cadiz and Seville provinces in Andalusia. The remainder of the billboards are in Aragon (6), Asturias (5), Balearic Islands (1), Canary Islands (1), Castile-La Mancha (13), Castile and Leon (14), Extremadura (5), Galicia (5), Madrid (2), Melilla (1), Navarre (1), La Rioja (2), the Valencian Community (11) and the Basque Country (1).


Arguments about the Osborne Bull

The first threat to the bull was in 1962, when José Antonio Osborne, the Communications Director of the bodegas,  received a call from the General Directorate of Highways in 1962, to remove the figures from the roads. It was then  that the company took advantage of the restructuring from wood to meta, to also increase its original size.

Until 1988, the Osborne Bull kept the name of "Veterano" brandy on its back; since in that year the General Highways Act prohibited advertising along roads, the company decided to remove it to circumvent the legislation and maintain the black figure of the bull. In 1994, a new publication of the General Highway Regulations attacked the imposing figure once again, but the Town Council and Autonomous Communities' Association came up with the "Save the Bull" campaign that advocated for it to be turned into an asset of cultural interest. It was not until 1997, when the Spanish Supreme Court declared that the Osborne figure went way beyond the commercial, "exceeding its advertising sense and integrating itself into the landscape," so as to be considered a very graphic identifier of Spain."

 


 

If you take a road trip around the 505,990 square kilometres of Spain, it is common to see the image of a huge black bull standing at the top of a hill or near a road in different places. This feature is known nationally as "The Osborne Bull."

For 60 years, the Osborne Bull has been keeping watch over some of our roads. In the beginning, this figure was a billboard which only measured about 4 metres high, and which nowadays -those that remain - reach 14 metres weighing up to 4,000 kilos.

Over the decades, the Osborne Bull has become integrated into the roadside landscape, and despite the controversies that have arisen around it, the Spanish have adapted it as a decorative part of other items, like car stickers, on t-shirts, caps, key rings, at sporting events (appearing at least in the stands) and including being superimposed on the Spanish flag as a shield.

How was this symbol born?

It all started when the Osborne company, one of the oldest brandy exporting bodegas in the world and the second largest in Spain, decided to create a logo that would represent one of its most recognised brands of spirits, called "Veterano".

This is how the Osborne Bull, also called the the "Spanish Bull", was created by the hand of the painter and artist, Manuel Prieto, who was the Artistic Director of the Azor advertising agency, which was hired to launch this advertising campaign.

The first of these unique bulls was put into place in 1957 in the town of Cabanillas de la Sierra, right at kilometre 55 on the motorway from Madrid to Burgos. Three years later (1960), there were already 500 throughout the peninsula, originally made of wood, until its structure was changed to metal to resist bad weather.

Currently, only 91 bulls remain, distributed irregularly throughout Spain. Most are around Marco de Jerez, especially in the Cadiz and Seville provinces in Andalusia. The remainder of the billboards are in Aragon (6), Asturias (5), Balearic Islands (1), Canary Islands (1), Castile-La Mancha (13), Castile and Leon (14), Extremadura (5), Galicia (5), Madrid (2), Melilla (1), Navarre (1), La Rioja (2), the Valencian Community (11) and the Basque Country (1).


Arguments about the Osborne Bull

The first threat to the bull was in 1962, when José Antonio Osborne, the Communications Director of the bodegas,  received a call from the General Directorate of Highways in 1962, to remove the figures from the roads. It was then  that the company took advantage of the restructuring from wood to meta, to also increase its original size.

Until 1988, the Osborne Bull kept the name of "Veterano" brandy on its back; since in that year the General Highways Act prohibited advertising along roads, the company decided to remove it to circumvent the legislation and maintain the black figure of the bull. In 1994, a new publication of the General Highway Regulations attacked the imposing figure once again, but the Town Council and Autonomous Communities' Association came up with the "Save the Bull" campaign that advocated for it to be turned into an asset of cultural interest. It was not until 1997, when the Spanish Supreme Court declared that the Osborne figure went way beyond the commercial, "exceeding its advertising sense and integrating itself into the landscape," so as to be considered a very graphic identifier of Spain."

 


Posted by: Graham at 00:00

Labels:

Monday, 05 February 2018

Sangria

A home-made and refreshing drink

Sangria: a home-made and refreshing drink

Considered as a family drink and used to accompany food such as lunch or dinner, sangria has a large number of followers in Spain, the rest of Europe and Latin America.

It’s a drink that is part of the Spanish character. You may wonder why it is so popular in our country? Because sangria is a drink of sun and summer - that’s why! It is what sets the tone in small gatherings at home in Spain, during those hot months at that time of the year. 

Origin and popularity

It is said that the Autonomous Community of Castile-La Mancha is the region where most sangria is produced.

Nevertheless, this drink did not exactly originate in this area. At this point, its origin remains somewhat confused.

To begin with, you should know that spiced wine was one of the most consumed drinks in Europe from antiquity, because it was safer to drink than water, as this was not potable.

There are records in a dictionary dating from 1788 where a priest, known as Father Esteban Torres, stated that sangria was a “drink invented by the English that is drunk a lot in the English and French colonies in America.” On the other hand, an 18th century English magazine mentions a punch “with strong wine and Madeira called sangre.”

Another theory places sangria’s origins in the Antilles when it was a British colony. Even the main expression comes from the English word “sangaree” which was inspired in its turn by the Spanish “sangre” because of the characteristic colour given by the red wine.

This was how sangria, which was called “wine lemonade” in some Spanish colonies in America, reclaimed its linguistic origins by expanding its consumption in Spain after 1850.

But, it was not until the Francoist period (1936-1975) that sangria became popular in Spain, especially in the 1960s with the imminent arrival of tourists.

Its consumption caught on so much that its recipe was established in a law in 1970, which stated that it is a “drink made of wine and still or sparkling water with juices, natural citrus fruit essences, with or without sugar.

Currently, sangria is drunk in many countries, nevertheless, it cannot be called this anywhere other than Portugal and Spain, due to an agreement established by the European Parliament, which indicates that this expression should only be used in these countries, otherwise it should be called “a flavoured wine-based drink”, which must be followed by the country of origin.

Simple and careful recipe

The RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) defines sangria as a cold drink made with water, wine, sugar, lemon and other additions.

Sangria is very easy to prepare and the only difficulty is in the fact that the fruit should macerate for a couple of hours so that the drink has a definite taste of fresh fruit, but this should not exceed more than 3 hours.

So far, three types of sangria are well-known: one made with red wine, one made with white or sparkling wine, also known as white sangria, and Zurra (or Zurracapote) originally from northern Spain and made with red wine, peaches, apricots and nectarines.

The simplest recipe only involves wine, squeezed oranges or lemon juice, peaches or apple slices, sugar, lemonade, rum or brandy (these last three ingredients are optional). And of course, lots of ice because it is a drink served cold.

It should be served in a clear jug, so that you can see the fruit: and this should have a neck of the sort that allows you to place a long ladle in to stir the contents and prevent damage.

And knowing this, sangria is one of the drinks that you should try if you are not Spanish and decide to take a trip in the hot summer months. Do not hesitate to ask the locals for the best Sangria in town!


Sangria: a home-made and refreshing drink

Considered as a family drink and used to accompany food such as lunch or dinner, sangria has a large number of followers in Spain, the rest of Europe and Latin America.

It’s a drink that is part of the Spanish character. You may wonder why it is so popular in our country? Because sangria is a drink of sun and summer - that’s why! It is what sets the tone in small gatherings at home in Spain, during those hot months at that time of the year. 

Origin and popularity

It is said that the Autonomous Community of Castile-La Mancha is the region where most sangria is produced.

Nevertheless, this drink did not exactly originate in this area. At this point, its origin remains somewhat confused.

To begin with, you should know that spiced wine was one of the most consumed drinks in Europe from antiquity, because it was safer to drink than water, as this was not potable.

There are records in a dictionary dating from 1788 where a priest, known as Father Esteban Torres, stated that sangria was a “drink invented by the English that is drunk a lot in the English and French colonies in America.” On the other hand, an 18th century English magazine mentions a punch “with strong wine and Madeira called sangre.”

Another theory places sangria’s origins in the Antilles when it was a British colony. Even the main expression comes from the English word “sangaree” which was inspired in its turn by the Spanish “sangre” because of the characteristic colour given by the red wine.

This was how sangria, which was called “wine lemonade” in some Spanish colonies in America, reclaimed its linguistic origins by expanding its consumption in Spain after 1850.

But, it was not until the Francoist period (1936-1975) that sangria became popular in Spain, especially in the 1960s with the imminent arrival of tourists.

Its consumption caught on so much that its recipe was established in a law in 1970, which stated that it is a “drink made of wine and still or sparkling water with juices, natural citrus fruit essences, with or without sugar.

Currently, sangria is drunk in many countries, nevertheless, it cannot be called this anywhere other than Portugal and Spain, due to an agreement established by the European Parliament, which indicates that this expression should only be used in these countries, otherwise it should be called “a flavoured wine-based drink”, which must be followed by the country of origin.

Simple and careful recipe

The RAE (Royal Spanish Academy) defines sangria as a cold drink made with water, wine, sugar, lemon and other additions.

Sangria is very easy to prepare and the only difficulty is in the fact that the fruit should macerate for a couple of hours so that the drink has a definite taste of fresh fruit, but this should not exceed more than 3 hours.

So far, three types of sangria are well-known: one made with red wine, one made with white or sparkling wine, also known as white sangria, and Zurra (or Zurracapote) originally from northern Spain and made with red wine, peaches, apricots and nectarines.

The simplest recipe only involves wine, squeezed oranges or lemon juice, peaches or apple slices, sugar, lemonade, rum or brandy (these last three ingredients are optional). And of course, lots of ice because it is a drink served cold.

It should be served in a clear jug, so that you can see the fruit: and this should have a neck of the sort that allows you to place a long ladle in to stir the contents and prevent damage.

And knowing this, sangria is one of the drinks that you should try if you are not Spanish and decide to take a trip in the hot summer months. Do not hesitate to ask the locals for the best Sangria in town!


Posted by: Carmen Contreras at 00:00

Labels: sangria , Andalucia , refreshing drink , home-made , Spain

Sunday, 28 January 2018

Andalusian fishing

Leisure activity in Andalucia

A productive and leisure activity in Andalusia 

Andalusia has become known for being a region of culture, fiestas and good food, but its greatest attraction is its natural beauty; the highlights of which are its seas, rivers, streams, pools, lakes and lagoons that as well as contributing to tourism, embellish our region and allow one of the largest productive activities like fishing to develop. 

Fishing is just one of the activities with a long tradition in Andalusia. It is an essential part of the Andalusian economy and diet. The fishing fleet in our region is the second most important in Spain due its vast area. 

How did Andalusian fishing develop?  

Andalusia has discovered an inexhaustible source of wealth in fishing. It is estimated that annual production exceeds 65 thousand tonnes, as many people work in this activity. About 1,493 boats have been registered as engaged in fishing in our waters and in international fishing grounds. 

Fishing in Andalusia has been developing since the 16th century, the period when this resource really began to be exploited. Catalan and Levantine companies introduced trawling techniques to the Andalusian coast. 

From the 18th century, Spanish fishermen attached great importance to Isla Cristina in Huelva province, which became Andalusia's main fishing port, being the leader in the industry in terms of fresh fish auctions. 

In the fishing industry in Andalusia, there is an increase in aquaculture activity (a technique for managing and developing the breeding of fish, molluscs, and algae in fresh or salt water). The main species produced in aquaculture are sea bass, sea bream, sole and tuna, to which can be added molluscs, such as mussels. This activity mainly takes place in the marshes, estuaries and intertidal areas of Huelva and Seville. 

A leisure activity

 Even though Andalusian fishing is extremely beneficial to the economy, it is not just restricted to those who do it to earn a living, since it also leaves room for enthusiasts who enjoy it as a leisure activity. 

Andalusia, recognised as an area with a seafaring tradition, is doubtlessly the ideal place for recreational fishing, due to its incredible settings which include reservoirs, rivers and seas. 

Nevertheless, this type of activity cannot be carried out everywhere. There are designated areas for this, called “Cotos de Pesca” (fishing preserves) which are controlled by well-established rules that allow for the appropriation and use of catches in accordance with the annual fishing regulations.

Likewise, there are also “Cotos de Ciprínidos” (freshwater Cyprinid fishing preserves) designated for reservoirs. Species permitted to be caught in these preserves are barb, pike, catfish and black-bass. Meanwhile, common and rainbow trout are the most plentiful species in Andalusia's river preserves.

The fishing period or season in Andalusia generally begins in March and extends until the end of August and September. Similarly, there are preserves where it is possible to carry out this activity 12 months a year, such as the Santa Maria reservoir in Pozoblanco (Cordoba province).

Other recommended places are the Corumbel reservoir (in the municipality of La Palma del Condado in Huelva province), the San Rafael de Navallana reservoir (in Cordoba province) and Guadalmellato reservoir (which is a river in Cordoba that is a right bank tributary of the Guadalquivir).

There are 49 fishing preserves in total spread around all the rivers and reservoirs in the eight Andalusian provinces, which makes our region one of the best places to practise recreational fishing. 

An extensive river system 

 The river flows in Andalusia are one of the highest because of certain factors in mountainous areas and in areas near to the sea with abundant rainfall. 

The Guadalquivir river, which includes Seville, Cordoba and Jaen provinces and a large part of Granada, Huelva and Cadiz provinces, is the largest in Andalusia and becomes the main waterway, formed by a group of rivers, lakes and streams.

Andalusia is divided into two zones that depend on its hydrological system: the Andalusian Mediterranean Basin is formed to the south and the Guadalquivir Basin to the north.

The Andalusian Mediterranean Basin is not a river basin with so many channels, because there are no rivers that flow entirely through it with tributaries coming to it from each bank. All the small basins form the so-called Andalusian Mediterranean Basin. 

A productive and leisure activity in Andalusia 

Andalusia has become known for being a region of culture, fiestas and good food, but its greatest attraction is its natural beauty; the highlights of which are its seas, rivers, streams, pools, lakes and lagoons that as well as contributing to tourism, embellish our region and allow one of the largest productive activities like fishing to develop. 

Fishing is just one of the activities with a long tradition in Andalusia. It is an essential part of the Andalusian economy and diet. The fishing fleet in our region is the second most important in Spain due its vast area. 

How did Andalusian fishing develop?  

Andalusia has discovered an inexhaustible source of wealth in fishing. It is estimated that annual production exceeds 65 thousand tonnes, as many people work in this activity. About 1,493 boats have been registered as engaged in fishing in our waters and in international fishing grounds. 

Fishing in Andalusia has been developing since the 16th century, the period when this resource really began to be exploited. Catalan and Levantine companies introduced trawling techniques to the Andalusian coast. 

From the 18th century, Spanish fishermen attached great importance to Isla Cristina in Huelva province, which became Andalusia's main fishing port, being the leader in the industry in terms of fresh fish auctions. 

In the fishing industry in Andalusia, there is an increase in aquaculture activity (a technique for managing and developing the breeding of fish, molluscs, and algae in fresh or salt water). The main species produced in aquaculture are sea bass, sea bream, sole and tuna, to which can be added molluscs, such as mussels. This activity mainly takes place in the marshes, estuaries and intertidal areas of Huelva and Seville. 

A leisure activity

 Even though Andalusian fishing is extremely beneficial to the economy, it is not just restricted to those who do it to earn a living, since it also leaves room for enthusiasts who enjoy it as a leisure activity. 

Andalusia, recognised as an area with a seafaring tradition, is doubtlessly the ideal place for recreational fishing, due to its incredible settings which include reservoirs, rivers and seas. 

Nevertheless, this type of activity cannot be carried out everywhere. There are designated areas for this, called “Cotos de Pesca” (fishing preserves) which are controlled by well-established rules that allow for the appropriation and use of catches in accordance with the annual fishing regulations.

Likewise, there are also “Cotos de Ciprínidos” (freshwater Cyprinid fishing preserves) designated for reservoirs. Species permitted to be caught in these preserves are barb, pike, catfish and black-bass. Meanwhile, common and rainbow trout are the most plentiful species in Andalusia's river preserves.

The fishing period or season in Andalusia generally begins in March and extends until the end of August and September. Similarly, there are preserves where it is possible to carry out this activity 12 months a year, such as the Santa Maria reservoir in Pozoblanco (Cordoba province).

Other recommended places are the Corumbel reservoir (in the municipality of La Palma del Condado in Huelva province), the San Rafael de Navallana reservoir (in Cordoba province) and Guadalmellato reservoir (which is a river in Cordoba that is a right bank tributary of the Guadalquivir).

There are 49 fishing preserves in total spread around all the rivers and reservoirs in the eight Andalusian provinces, which makes our region one of the best places to practise recreational fishing. 

An extensive river system 

 The river flows in Andalusia are one of the highest because of certain factors in mountainous areas and in areas near to the sea with abundant rainfall. 

The Guadalquivir river, which includes Seville, Cordoba and Jaen provinces and a large part of Granada, Huelva and Cadiz provinces, is the largest in Andalusia and becomes the main waterway, formed by a group of rivers, lakes and streams.

Andalusia is divided into two zones that depend on its hydrological system: the Andalusian Mediterranean Basin is formed to the south and the Guadalquivir Basin to the north.

The Andalusian Mediterranean Basin is not a river basin with so many channels, because there are no rivers that flow entirely through it with tributaries coming to it from each bank. All the small basins form the so-called Andalusian Mediterranean Basin. 

Posted by: Carmen Contreras at 00:00

Labels: sea , rivers , Andalusia , fishing , Spain , Andalucia

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